Editorial Team

Dr Matthew Carbery

Matthew Carberyis an Early Career Researcher currently living in Cambridge, UK. He has published work on phenomenology and poetics, most recently his book Phenomenology and the Late Twentieth Century American Long PoemHis poetry has been published in Tears in the FenceBlackbox ManifoldCTRL+ALT+DELOtolithsStrideand Dead King Magazine.

He is interested in American poetics, phenomenology, existentialisms, ecopoetics, free jazz, hip-hop and Africana philosophy.

 

Harrison Sullivan

Harrison Sullivan is a PhD candidate at the University of Kent in Canterbury. His thesis is provisionally titled “A Canvas in the Open Air: Landscape and Nation in English Poetry” and is a study of the works of five English poets: Andrew Crozier, Maggie O’Sullivan, Allen Fisher, Wendy Mulford and James Berry.

His interests are British poetry, posthumanism, animal studies, ecocriticism and phenomenology. Along with fellow editor Peter Adkins, he is the co-organiser of the Posthumanist Reading Group at the University of Kent.

 

Peter Adkins

Peter Adkins is a PhD candidate at the University of Kent in Canterbury. His thesis is provisionally entitled “Modernism in the time of the Anthropocene: Ecology, Aesthetics and the Novel” and is a study of the works of James Joyce, Virginia Woolf and Djuna Barnes.

His interests lie somewhere between modernist experimentation, posthumanism, animal studies, ecocriticism, deconstructivist philosophy and contemporary fiction. He is the co-organiser of the Posthumanist Reading Group at the University of Kent.

                      

Caitlin Stobie

Caitlin Stobie is a PhD candidate at the University of Leeds, where she is co-founder of the Leeds Animal Studies Network. Her poems and short stories have appeared in journals including Poetry & Audience, The Stockholm Review of Literature, Flash, Reflex Fiction, Zoomorphic, and Plumwood Mountain. 

Her interests include contemporary fiction, posthumanism, animal studies, new materialism, ecocriticism, and the interstices between literature and biology.

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